Are Claimed Global Record-Temperatures Valid?

Watts Up With That?

The New York Times claims 2016 was the hottest year on record. Click for article.

Guest essay by Clyde Spencer

Introduction

The point of this article is that one should not ascribe more accuracy and precision to available global temperature data than is warranted, after examination of the limitations of the data set(s). One regularly sees news stories claiming that the recent year/month was the (first, or second, etc.) warmest in recorded history. This claim is reinforced with a stated temperature difference or anomaly that is some hundredths of a degree warmer than some reference, such as the previous year(s). I’d like to draw the reader’s attention to the following quote from Taylor (1982):

“The most important point about our two experts’ measurements is this: like most scientific measurements, they would both have been useless, if they had not included reliable statements of their uncertainties.”

Before going any further…

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Exoplanet discovery by an amateur astronomer shows the power of citizen science

Tallbloke's Talkshop

Planetary detective work [credit: superwasp.org]
Pattern recognition is still best left to humans it seems.

You don’t need to be a professional astronomer to find new worlds orbiting distant stars, as Phys.org reports.

Darwin mechanic and amateur astronomer Andrew Grey this week helped to discover a new exoplanet system with at least four orbiting planets. But Andrew did have professional help and support.

The discovery was a highlight moment of this week’s three-evening special ABC Stargazing Live, featuring British physicist Brian Cox, presenter Julia Zemiro and others.

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