Proof the New York Times Stealthily Revises its Articles after Publication

Watts Up With That?

Guest essay by Leo Goldstein

The Commissar Vanishes: The Falsification of Photographs and Art in Stalin’s Russia is a 1997 book by David King about the censoring of photographs and fraudulent creation of “photographs” in Joseph Stalin’s Soviet Union through silent alteration via airbrushing and other techniques.

NY Times regularly revises its articles after publication. The revisions are substantial, undisclosed, and are nothing like real time updates in developing stories. These are regular articles that undergo dramatic changes that appear as if NY Times editors received a commissar’s call stressing the party line and demanding the article matches it exactly, with the NY Times editors dutifully obliging.

I recently stumbled on one of such revisions. Within hours, the description of Scott Pruitt, the newly appointed EPA head, in the NY Times article went from being an “ally of fossil fuel Industry,” to a “climate change dissenter,” to a “climate…

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Discussion: Five reasons blog posts are of higher scientific quality than journal articles

Watts Up With That?

Dr. Judith Curry tips me to this interesting blog post by Daniel Lakens, an experimental psychologist at the Human-Technology Interaction group at Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands.

The 20% Statistician

A blog on statistics, methods, and open science. Understanding 20% of statistics will improve 80% of your inferences.


Five reasons blog posts are of higher scientific quality than journal articles

The Dutch toilet cleaner ‘WC-EEND’ (literally: ‘Toilet Duck’) aired a famous commercial in 1989 that had the slogan ‘We from WC-EEND advise… WC-EEND’. It is now a common saying in The Netherlands whenever someone gives an opinion that is clearly aligned with their self-interest. In this blog, I will examine the hypothesis that blogs are, on average, of higher quality than journal articles. Below, I present 5 arguments in favor of this hypothesis.

  1. Blogs have Open Data, Code, and Materials [when technical articles are published, yes, whenever possible]

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